Past Reflections Statements

 

BAISL SPRING MEETING

Posted on April, 2022 by Michelle Loomis

Librarian and Digital Media Specialist

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

Quarterly meeting of the Bay Area Independent School Librarian network.


Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

So many takeaways! This meeting focused largely on our digital resources, and the information was very useful. We learned that the California State Library has added a series of STEM databases (now available through the Burke’s Library), and that there may be a more cost-effective way to purchase some of our ebooks. We also discussed our desired changes to our consortium’s ebook collection, and are especially motivated to increase the number of available audiobooks (including and especially those partnered with ebooks) to best meet the diverse reading needs of our students. One unexpected but interesting focus of the day was the discussion about our digital vendors and their connection to the rise in school library censorship across the country. This is not something we need to act on at this time, but our vigilance is vital. In short, in several states digital vendors are being forced to comply with keyword filters provided to them by individual school districts which, depending upon who holds the administrative credentials, can result (and in some places have resulted) in the unintended consequence of filtering content statewide. Finally, we learned that Overdrive has added a collection of Spanish language books for young readers, which are also excellent for Spanish language learners. I am excited to share this information with our Spanish teachers.

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

One of my ever-continuing goals is to diversify the voices in our Library collection. Virtually every one of our discussions from this meeting hit on that goal.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

This meeting gave me tools that can enhance learning and recreational reading across our community, whether working with language teachers to provide beginning language storybooks, helping history teachers access materials from wider range of perspectives, or providing classrooms with even more literary mirrors and windows from our collection.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

PD #258

 

DEI FOR WHITE ADMINISTRATORS

Posted on April 25, 2022 by Alice Moore

Head of Lower School 

Dear colleagues,


I just completed the last in a three-part series of workshops hosted by CATDC called “From Theory to Action: DEI for White Administrators”. It was led by the San Francisco Equity Leaders Team; some of whom many of you know!


I was drawn to this training because of exactly what Renita said before the last Incluu session: this work (being an anti-racist educator/co-conspirator) is a muscle that needs to be strengthened and that requires practice and constant work.


There was so much packed into these three 90 minute workshops that it would be hard to cover everything in this write up, but here are some highlights:


The first session was individually-focused in nature, starting with reflecting on our own racial autobiography. I have done this activity before and usually write about my awareness of race and not as much about how whiteness has shaped me. As a white person, one’s racial autobiography starts well before one’s birth. Tim Wise writes about this in his book, White Like Me. In the first session, we also watched a video of Heather Hackman talking about how to replace guilt and shame with curiosity, grief, and humility. It is well worth watching.


In the second session, we reflected on our racial biographies, asking: How do we present, outwardly and inwardly? How does the way we self-identify compare with how we’re likely perceived? How does this impact our role as administrators? How are we going to de-center whiteness?


We talked about authentic engagement, how to recognize stress so that we can be our best selves, and how to make difficult moments learning moments by breathing, waiting to respond, listening, and seeking understanding. I wrote down this quote, though didn’t write down who said it, “Every conversation is a threat to someone’s identity.” We talked about things that impede vs build relationships and trust.


The third session had us focus back on our schools and the different styles of power there are- and that we have- in relation to this work in our schools. We worked individually on a “culture scorecard” for our schools and then in small groups to discuss an action item we would take at our own schools.


I am so glad that I attended this workshop for so many reasons. As a white school leader, I feel the need to be extra vigilant about my words, actions, and responses. I have so much to learn and reflect on. I seek to have a positive impact through my role at Burke’s and know that this comes with a huge amount of responsibility and work that is ongoing.


I am happy to discuss any and all of this any time!

San Francisco Equity Leaders Site:

https://www.sfequityleaders.com/

Heather Hackman - Video:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MJk-VvbeCNh9MDuxE-RD93eNgtziahux/view

PD - Folio Post

 

PLANNING FOR AN ENTIRE YEAR OF GENERAL MUSIC

Posted on April 25, 2022 by Lisa Mandelstein

Lower School Music

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

Webinar on strategies for planning a whole year of lessons - geared specifically for general music teachers


Option 3: Start/Stop/Continue

What are you going to START doing?

+ Make a list of the most crucial learning goals/music standards for each grade, and what time of year I place the most focused conscious learning for each learning goal so I'm not trying to grade everything all year + Use the 7 Step process suggested by the presenter to organize my thinking

1. Calculate contact time (classes) for entire year

2. calculate contact time per report period

3. put performance/sharings on the calendar

4. Decide what is most important for kids to learn at a conscious level - then divide among grading periods (see #1 above) - add beginning of year management and performance prep time to calendar of contact time

5. Plan and Add a list of *Lessons* (in this workshop, lesson referred to all the possible activity strands related to a song/dance/other material) by marking periods that match goal emphasis (and I'd like to find a better name for this as to me lesson means what I do on a specific day)

6. Work in performances/assessments 7. Reflect and adjust at the end of a unit, marking period, year + organize my google drive to reflect the units - materials - activities - assessments in a way that makes things easier to find (with Jenepher's help???)

What are you going to STOP doing?

Not STOP, but change -

1. adjust the format of my new online curriculum /lesson plan Google doc to show the learning goals/standards for each learning period

2. Stop pressuring myself or being critical of all I'm NOT able to get done - be more realistic about how much I can get done in a class, unit, year

3. Stop winging the assessment portion but plan more strategically in advance - which may allow me to get more

specific in my report assessment lines if I want (?)

What are you going to CONTINUE doing?

1. Using the online google curriculum doc I started this year - and adding to its functionality by linking to materials, listing standards, adding assessments 2. Allowing for serendipity, creative epiphanies, and unexpected delight in activities, performance options, curricular left turns

3. Using lessons that students love that fit the standards

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

while geared for music, the concepts could help anyone think from the big-picture down to the day-by-day, to feel more ahead of the game in planning curriculum and assessing student progress.

PD #256

 

AMERICAN ORFF SCHULWERK ASSOCIATION NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Posted on April 25, 2022 by Lisa Mandelstein

Lower School Music

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

Music and movement workshops based on: vocal improvisation circles, harmonizing to Appalachian folk songs, discussions about the history of white/brown/black cultural elements in music and dance across the diaspora; body percussion building blocks for musical composition, and Cuban percussion and culture.


Option 2: Triangle/Square/Circle

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?

1. Several powerful acapella songs that would add to SEL and assembly connections

2. A Cuban rhythm with an accompanying call and response song that could be accessible to 4th graders; this uses the correct rhythm for Cuban rumba clave which I know understand and have a clear process for teaching correctly; I also have a better understanding of clave negro and clave blanco - how they are the same a different and when each is used

3. A better understanding of several folksongs from the Appalachian region and how African rhythms were originally part of these traditions; how they are being brought back into the canon.

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

1. the power and necessity of gathering with community - to sing, speak our hearts, dance - how important music and dance is for building and affirming community

2. Building the skills in my students so they are able to participate in community events like those presented at the conference in an artistic and musical way is a worthy pursuit.

What is still circling around in my head?

1. How can I get Burke's to understand and support more fully this idea of the vital importance of gathering with community - to sing, speak our hearts, dance - how important music and dance is for building and affirming community - and how this is different than performance

2. How can I better build the skills my students would need to participate more fully and confidently in community events like those presented at the conference - what to do when a leader says "add harmony"; or "listen and add in a rhythm that compliments those before you"; or starts calling a dance . .

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

So many opportunities for crossing curricula and making movement and music a part of whatever you are teaching; it is an inspiring, relaxing, and heart-filling experience

PD #257

 

TEACHING WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES: A VIRTUAL SUMMIT

Posted on March 24, 2022 by Michelle Loomis

Librarian and Digital Media Specialist

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

An overview of the New York Times' educational resources and the innovative ways they can be used in the classroom.


Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

The NY Times and The Learning Network offer a huge number of interesting resources to supplement almost every area of learning. There are class openers to get students thinking and sharing (What's Going on in this Picture? What's Going on in this Graph?), writing prompts, the Hyphen-Nation video series, the Headway project (looking at progress and possibility through the lens of events in recent history), the Times Machine for archival content, lesson plans, mentor texts, author annotations, and more. I was interested in this training because I have previously integrated NY Times' educational resources into advisory and HEART, but the content is really intended for 8th grade and beyond (with an emphasis on high school). However, I believe that many of these resources have the power to be extremely powerful in a 7th or 8th grade classroom with adaptation. They could also encourage interdepartmental collaboration.

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

I am always looking for new resources to add to the Library's collection. While we have a print subscription to the New York Times, much of their Learning Network content is available to digital subscribers only and cost-prohibitive, especially if underutilized. To make this decision, I will take some time to speak with 7th and 8th grade teachers to see whether and how they might make use of these resources.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

These resources could encourage a number of collaborations with other faculty, whether using the NY Times Machine to research the archives for a particular subject, exploring the social implications of a new scientific discovery for a science-history/social studies collaboration (e.g. Headway's series on the peat lands in Democratic Republic of Congo), a collaboration between math and virtually any other subject using What's Going on in this Graph, or a History/English/Makery collaboration using Hyphen-Nation. This just barely scratches the surface, and the opportunities are endless.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

Learn how the NY Times education resources can enhance your lessons and create collaborative learning opportunities.

PD #255

 

WHAT'S NEW IN CHILDREN'S BOOKS

Posted on March 03, 2022 by Diana Rivers

LS Librarian

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

In this highly engaging seminar, award-winning library media specialist and international presenter Deborah Salyer highlights the best, newly published children’s books, including picture books, chapter books, novels, graphic novels, poetry, nonfiction titles, and more! Deborah reads and evaluates each new children’s book, then develops fresh, innovative ideas to use them in all areas of your curriculum or programming. As a bonus, she also finds the best, new online tools and apps to pair with the books she shares. Many of the ideas, apps and online resources are applicable to other books, as well. From the dozens of books, resources, and strategies, you can choose the new books and activities that are best suited to your students and the priorities of your classroom or library.


You’ll also learn great ways to use technology to extend your interactions with readers about books in ways they love to learn.

Triangle/Square/Circle

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?

Three things I took away from this workshop were the concept of creating a livebinder, as well as 2 new websites of interest: forum.teachingbooks.net for book reviews and recommendations and kidlittv.com for book trailers to show students. I learned that I can use all of these in conjunction to help grow my library connection and to bolster student interest in books.

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

I believe that it is vital to stay current with best practices and new releases. In my position, I am able to order materials that I think will really speak to students, so this opportunity really connected with me making sure my orders reflect the best that is out there.

What is still circling around in my head?

I am still processing the livebinder that the presenter shared and still looking at the different links therein. There is so much great information that I want to make sure I can fully take it all in.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

If you want to know what's new in children's literature, I highly recommend this recorded workshop that you can watch at any time!

PD #254

 

THE ART OF COACHING

Posted on February 16, 2022 by Julie Rembrandt

3/4 Learning Specialist

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

This workshop required the participants to do a lot of individual work, based on Elena’ Aguilar’s book, The Art of Coaching (2013). It introduced participants to a variety of tools and resources to improve your coaching skills, and then practice these skills with a small group.

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

I always have a goal of fine tuning how I am supporting the teachers. Using these tools will help our relationships and ultimately help our students.

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

I always have a goal of fine tuning how I am supporting the teachers. Using these tools will help our relationships and ultimately help our students.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

This workshop was all about fine tuning my skills to collaborate with other faculty! I look forward to using these strategies and hope this will lead to more collaboration.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

PD #253

 

IXL LIVE

Posted on February 10, 2022 by Jess Goldstein

Math Specialist

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

IXL live helped me do a deeper dive into using IXL for math in grades 5-8. 

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

I learned how to administer diagnostic snapshots to our students and save progress. I learned a few advanced analytical tools, and how to use leaderboards to motivate students.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

I was able to share learning with the US math team.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

Anyone looking to use IXL in their classroom (math and english).

 

THE ART OF COACHING

Posted on February 08, 2022 by Zach Swan

Teacher

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

This highly interactive workshop is based on Elena’s best-selling book, The Art of Coaching (2013). It introduces participants to tools and resources, with an opportunity to see them modeled right away.

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

I will start incorporating some of the coaching strategies I learned and practiced in this workshop during my weekly meetings with my AT. Coaching relies heavily on asking good questions, listening, and probing to help mentees realize their own goals and paths towards success.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

This opportunity is a direct tie into the way I collaborate with my AT. It has provided a menu of tools and strategies to help with communication and fostering growth and agency.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

PD #251


 

36 ANNUAL EXECUTIVE FUNCTION CONFERENCE: PROMOTING RESILIENCE AND EQUITY FOR ALL STUDENTS

Posted on January 3, 2022 by Ron Malek

Learning Specialist

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

As students return to their classrooms after the pandemic recedes, how do we build a school culture that re-engages all students and promotes self-understanding, persistence, and resilience?

How do executive function strategies build a foundation for equity in our classrooms and our schools?

How do we promote executive function by teaching strategies for goal-setting, cognitive flexibility, organizing and prioritizing, accessing working memory, and self-monitoring to empower students to succeed in the classroom and online learning?

How do we promote students’ strengths in social-emotional areas so we reduce their anxiety and stress in the context of the classroom?

How do executive function weaknesses affect the performance of students with LD, ADHD, ASD, and other learning difficulties?

Triangle/Square/Circle

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?

1. By intentionally teaching and practicing EF skills students become empowered to learn and thrive.

2. Strong application of executive function strategies promote success and protects students from developing a hopeless/helpless self-concept.

3. For marginalized groups, teaching these skills is critical for developing self-esteem, academic achievement, grit, and a growth mindset.

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

Regular, explicit instruction in EF skills allows students to make the invisible become visible and allows them to overcome challenges while increasing their ability to achieve academically while also building their sense of agency and self-esteem.

What is still circling around in my head?

How/when could we implement these school-wide?

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

This professional development offers practical strategies based on current research findings to support academic and social-emotional skills necessary to thrive in school.

PD #250


 

ADAPTING FAIRY TALES

Posted on December 13, 2021 by Kelley Vauk

2nd Grade Teacher

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

These workshops took place over three days in a virtual mini-institute. The TC instructors led workshops and discussions to share ideas to support students with dyslexia in Reading Workshop and across the day.

Start/Stop/Continue

What are you going to START doing?

I am going to start using the phonemic awareness videos from TC to review and solidify letter sound correspondence and to help build confidence in students to use the spelling knowledge they have or to utilize the resources in the room to help them (charts, word inside a word, another word they know). I would like to start holding them more accountable for the patterns we have taught. When reading and writing with students I also want to continue to work on my goal of giving feedback - one thing I would like to start emphasizing is returning to the text when solving tricky words (attending to the graphemes as well as the phonemes).

What are you going to STOP doing?

I am going to stop using dictation as a sole means to assess the spelling patterns taught in class and instead use their written work and other short writing projects to see if they are applying their spelling patterns.

What are you going to CONTINUE doing?

I am going to continue to work with the learning specialist and the other second grade teacher to differentiate reading and writing lessons and activities. All students need support as they move to the next level of their learning and many of the highlights of this workshop helped me think about how to do this work in a deeper and more meaningful way..

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

As always, TC doesn't disappoint - teaching and using the latest data to support teachers of students of all abilities, this workshop will give you resources and strategies to meet the needs to all learners in your classroom!

PD #248


 

SUPPORTING STUDENTS WITH DYSLEXIA IN READING WORKSHOP AND ACROSS THE SCHOOL DAY

Posted on December 10, 2021 by Lindy Ancelovici

Teacher

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

"This mini-institute will share our learning about how to support students with dyslexia in reading workshop. As a whole group, we will study dyslexia and how it affects the brain. We'll share new research that provides a picture of how students may present in the classrooms and the next steps you can take to support these students." -Reading and Writing Project

Goals & Collaborations

What are you going to START doing?

I am going to start paying more attention to the font and colors I use when typing things up for students. Black on white is most clear and some fonts are more friendly for those with dyslexia than other fonts. There are even free fonts that you can download online. I had no idea!

What are you going to STOP doing?

Stop using the MSV cueing system! This was a huge departure from TC's previous stance. It sounds like they are going to revise their reading units based on research that says MSV does not support phonics skills.

What are you going to CONTINUE doing?

I am going to continue using our reading time to informally assess students. One assessment idea that I loved was having students read a book to you, have them close the book, then write a word from one of the pages on a whiteboard and ask them to decode it. Such a simple task can inform teachers whether students are relying on MSV or using their phonics skills to read.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

PD #247


 

WANT TO CLOSE THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP? FIRST ADDRESS THE SEL GAP

Posted on December 07, 2021 by Rachel Dillman 

1st Grade AT

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

"Educators and students are finally settling back into their physical classroom spaces, and while we all desperately want a return to normal, we are finding that a lot has changed. Many of us are realizing we may have underestimated how much our students’ social, emotional, and academic development was impacted over the last eighteen months. While everyone did their best to take care of the needs of their students under difficult circumstances, the fact of the matter is that eighteen months of their lives were disrupted, and our students may be dealing with significant gaps in their social, emotional, and academic development. We simply can’t expect to close those gaps in six to nine weeks. So where do we go from here? In this Pop-Up PD, you will: Explore the impact of the pandemic on students’ social, emotional, and academic development Learn how to use our understanding of development to forge a path forward that will address gaps in students’ SEL skills Develop a plan to incrementally bridge the gap over the course of the year with Responsive Classroom practices"

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

The pandemic has impacted students in so many ways. The speakers discussed many impacts but three stuck out to me: 1) teachers across the nation have seen students be a lot more reactive. 

2) teachers have seen a lack of stamina in students of all ages 

3) There is a higher sense of fear overall, which leads to shutting down and higher general anxiety.


This PD left me with some food for thought: How will the pandemic affect kids later on down the road? Is their behavior the pandemic or other traumas? Is there an underlying traumas?

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

One of my goals this year was to help kids with their SEL skill development and get to a place where they understand what they need and have the words to advocate for what they need in and out of the classroom. This workshop focused on creating a plan for the development of SEL skills. They asked us to think about focusing on 1 of the 5 social and emotional competencies: cooperation, assertiveness, responsibility, empath, and self-control.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

During the workshop, I began to create a plan for teaching self-control to the first graders. The plan began with implementing self-control into morning meeting, moved on to an interactive model, then went to role-playing, and finished with a guided discovery. I began the process of outlining ideas for each category, but will collaborate with the 1st grade team on the best plan for teaching this social and emotional competency.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

PD #246

 

INTENSIVE PHONEMIC AWARENESS AND PHONICS INSTRUCTION FOR STUDENTS IN UPPER GRADES WHO NEED SUPPORT WITH FOUNDATIONAL READING, PHONICS SKILLS, AND SPELLING

Posted on August 10, 2021 by Emily Banks

3rd Grade Lead Teacher (3B)

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

This institute will support upper-grade teachers whose students need foundational skill support. The institute will tackle this work in ways that are joyful, asset-based, and inclusive.

Triangle/Square/Circle

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?

1. Effective phonics instruction is crucial to fostering long-term literacy skills.

2. There are more symbols than sounds in English (44 phonemes, 250 graphemes). It makes sense that students will not have mastered all of them in K-2.

3. High-frequency words should be taught using phonics principles, not through memorization.

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

Third and fourth grade are a "gray area" for phonics instruction. However, it is clear that phonics instruction is needed in upper elementary grades.

What is still circling around in my head?

What phonics skills have been taught K-2? What phonics needs do my students have? How will I assess this? What work should be done in the Learning Center and what should be done in the classroom? Should we adopt a common phonics curriculum in K-4 (i.e. Teachers College)?

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

PD #235


 

7TH GRADE CURRICULUM REVIEW AND NEW FACULTY MEMBER PREP

Posted on August 10, 2021 by Cami Jones

7/8 English Teacher

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

Ally and I reviewed the existing 7th grade curriculum, talked through changes we want to make and discussed Burke's culture, structures etc.

Triangle/Square/Circle

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?

1. Collaboration can be energizing when there's pedagogical/philosophical alignment.

2.Creative writing instruction is essential to the teaching of strong writing.

3. It's going to be a good year!

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

Making well-thought-out current events connections in ELA is extremely important.

What is still circling around in my head?

How do we continue to collaborate effectively as things get busier and busier?

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

PD #243


 

COLLABORATIVE CURRICULUM GRANT

Posted on August 19, 2021 by Genaro Castillo

Lead Teacher-3A

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

I met with Ms. Banks on Campus on 8/3 to get an overview of the 3rd grade academic and social emotional learning curriculum and resources. I also took time to learn from Ms. Banks about how to best integrate myself with the Burke's lower school faculty to be able to optimize our planning and instruction as a grade level team.

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

My biggest takeaways from working collaboratively with Ms. Banks is gaining familiarity with teacher's college writers and reader's workshop materials. I also became familiar with Burke's anti-racism social studies curriculum and units of study as well as the various different methods Ms. Banks uses to teach word study.

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

My goals this year are to provide meaningful implicit assessments/checks for understanding during whole class instruction and small groups. By familiarizing myself with the curriculum and getting advice on best practices from Ms. Banks I will be more prepared to create checks for understanding that align with my professional goals.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

Being proactive in my collaboration with Ms. Banks will allow me to better integrate myself into the lower school professional community. Since my mentor teacher is an upper school teacher, it is important for me to build strong collaborative relationships with my grade level team to best support the needs of Burke's 3rd graders and prepare meaningful academic instruction.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

I would recommend that any new lower school teacher at Burke's take the time to meet and receive advice from an experience colleague in their grade level to help with a smooth transition to the Burke's lower school faculty.

PD #242

 

8TH GRADE ADVISORY COLLABORATION

Posted on August 18, 2021 by Danielle Denton

Art Teacher/ Advisor

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

This summer grant was a way for last years 8th grade lead advisor to pass on and provide vital information for the new 8th grade team lead and Advisors. Included in the 2 days discussion will be a Planning of events to start the 8th grade tear out as well as create the new 2021-2022 meeting minutes/ agenda and Calendar which lays out the 8th grade year and its rituals and events. The layout and agenda of activities for St. Dorothys, clarification about how Special Block is used, What a Self Care Circuit is and why we have built it in to the 8th grade year and the HS Process.

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

Some big takeaways from our project together had to do with the 8th Grade lead Advisor role and the following information:

-8th Grade Advising Program

-8Th Grade Calendar of events

-8th Grade High School Process and Dates to remember 

-8th Grade self Care Circuit and purpose

-8th Grade St. Dorothys Overnight Activities and Rituals

-8th Grade BTSN

-8th Grade outdoor Ed -8th Grade End of Year Rituals

-8Th Grade Tea & Talk

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

I learned that I was going to be on the 7th grade team this year and so my goals as lead advisor have shifted to being a supportive and collaborative 7th grade team member. When I first started at Burkes I was on the 7th grade Advising team, My goal is to learn about any new changes to the 7th grade advising curriculum, As well as contribute any knowledge I have gained being on the 8th grade team and how it can help our 7th graders better prepare for their 8th grade year.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

I think this opportunity can lead to collaborating with other advising teams, by developing a Self Care Circuit for grades 5-7. I think it is important that we start to teach self care at an even earlier grade. Middle school can be a huge change. The sooner the students learn how to recognize when they are in need of some self care and that it is ok to care for oneself and What that looks like the BETTER. I look forward to participating as a guest art teacher to other grade level Self Care Circuits.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

Share various grade level advising program information with preceding grade level advisor teams ie. 7-8 & 5-6 for an organized and planned year.

PD #241

 

6TH GRADE ADVISORY CLEAN UP

Posted on August 15, 2021 by Anthony Sabedra

Spanish Teacher & 8th Grade Advisor

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

I took a day to reorganize and refashion the 6th grade advisory calendar (advisory at a glance) for the 2021-2022 6th grade advisory team. Since I will no longer serve on this team, I wanted to leave the advisors a clean version of this resource. In addition to this, I also included the duties/obligations specific to the 6th grade lead advisor.

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

My big take away from this work is the awareness of the many activities/projects that are used for a meaningful and well thought out advisory curriculum. We, the advisors, are able to chart progression and nurture development of the various well being/social-emotional topics for the year. Also, the calendar is a quick and easy resource for planning.

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

As I prepare to take on a new grade level of advisory, the clarity of this endeavor will help me in understanding the progression of the new curriculum. Fortunately, this tool exists for my new grade level. As I work within the new grade level and with new advisors, I will be better prepared to jump into the planning of a new academic year.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

In advisory work, it takes a village to make a meaningful, positive mark with your advisees. I will collaborate with the members of my advising team as well as with the former lead advisor of the 8th grade.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

I strongly encourage faculty who move to a different advising grade level to undertake this work prior to the beginning of the year.

PD #239

 

RESPONSIVE CLASSROOM FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL

Posted on August 12, 2021 by Ally Glass-Katz

7th Grade English Teacher

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

A four-day workshop focussed on student-centered social and emotional learning methods.

Triangle/Square/Circle

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?

1. Brain breaks are important & fun!

2. The first month is vital; slow down on curriculum and focus on creating a strong environment/community.

3. Small group learning enables students to take positive risks by lowering the stakes and by helping students develop social and emotional skills.

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

Teaching students to have set roles in their small groups. Also really focussing on creating a strong classroom routine.

What is still circling around in my head?

Thinking more about how and why to incorporate informal assessment into my classroom.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

PD #235


 

RESPONSIVE CLASSROOM

Posted on July 09, 2021 by Brittany MacArthur-Brooks

Associate Teacher Kindergarten

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

This is a four day course that provides world-class professional development in the Responsive Classroom approach to social-emotional learning (SEL). Responsive Classroom is a student-centered, social and emotional learning (SEL) approach to teaching and discipline. Responsive Classroom approach focuses on (1) creating optimal learning conditions for students to develop the academic, social, and emotional skills needed for success in and out of school, and (2) building positive school and classroom communities where students learn, behave, hope, and set and achieve goals. https://www.responsiveclassroom.org/courses/institutes/

Triangle/Square/Circle

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?

1. How important is it to start the day off with a morning meeting with all these components: Greeting- which will set a positive tone for the day, creates sense of recognition/belonging, it also practices hospitality & friendliness. Sharing- this helps builds community within the class, develops social emotional competencies & listening/speaking skills. Group Activity/Energizer- physical ,intellectual or artistic activities some may tie into curriculum or is just for fun, but students get to practice listening, following directions, and self-control. Morning Message- shapes the day and lets students know what to expect and get excited about what they'll be learning!


2. I learned about Interactive Modeling. You use this strategy when there is one way of doing something. This strategy is best to teach expectations, routines, social and emotional skills. There is no assuming that students know how to do something you must always model the expectation. I learnt the steps on how to teach Interactive modeling which are:

1. Say what you will model

2. Model the behavior

3. Ask the students what they noticed 4. Invite one or more students to model 5. Again, ask students what they noticed

6. Have students practice

7. Provide feedback


I like that there’s no assuming and that it’s like a “challenge” to them to see what they see from the modeling to make sure they understand. Having them practice is a key part of interactive modeling.


3. I learnt another teaching strategy called Guided Discovery. This strategy is used for teaching children to think creatively and critically. Used when there are multiple ways of doing something. This is focuses on exploration. Steps for this strategy include: introduction and naming, generation and modeling ideas by asking open ended questions to generate ideas, and get students to model, let students explore all materials, share finished work and then cleanup and care of materials.

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

Having teacher empathy: This is something I have and do naturally. Being able to draw on my own feelings and emotions and that that "imaginative leap" to understand a students unarticulated feelings.

What is still circling around in my head?

Teacher Language.There are 5 guide lines to effective teacher language but two are circling in my head. Be direct/genuine and Focus on an action when speaking to students. I was taught not to ask questions but to make statements to students. For example “push in your chair” vs “can you push in your chair please?” Don’t ask questions. Give an action. Also taught don’t use “please” only use please if asking student for a favor.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

You will enjoy this workshop! So much to learn and use in your classrooms every day!

PD #233


 

ASCD LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

Posted on June 16, 2021 by Susan Deemer

5/6 Science Teacher

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

1108 - 17 Things Resilient Teachers Do (and 4 Things They Hardly Ever Do).

Resiliency - that ability to “bounce back” after setbacks and to persist in the face of stress and adversity - is an essential skill for educators, particularly now. Because the profession is stressful and unpredictable at times, educators need to develop, practice, and refine their own resiliency before they attempt to support students. This relevant, interactive, and fun summit will provide techniques, strategies, and methods that help to build resiliency in educators.

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

Put my 'mask' on before trying to help others and communicate early and often when I start to see a student less engaged or distracted. I also need to find ways to unplug with my students in the classroom and reduce the amount of time on the iPad.

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

My only goal this year was to build positive relationships with my students and I feel this series of workshops helped me include more SEL into my daily lessons such as 'Get to know you' Kahoots!, teacher jeopardy games, and 'Draw This!'

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

I shared some of my take aways with my advising team and we developed games together.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

ASCD is a great organization that provides fantastic best-practice teaching strategies in their PD.

PD #232


 

STANFORD NBRC 2020-2021 SUPPORT PROGRAM

Posted on June 06, 2021 by Lisa Mandelstein

LS Music Specialist

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

Monthly, 2 hour zoom sessions going over the details of Maintenance of Certification requirements, brainstorming ideas for Professional Growth Projects, peer-to-peer feedback on writing, video projects and more

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

After brainstorming 5-6 professional growth opportunities since my initial NB certification that I had undertaken to meet student needs, I chose two and focused on developing evidence of my learning and of related student learning. I videoed classes after obtaining permission from families, and used the videos to examine, analyze and reflect on my teaching and my students' progress. I made suggestions for future improvements. I collected evidence of my own learning and of student growth and learning to support both of the PGEs I chose.

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

1. My first PGE was about learning to use online tools to increase student involvement and learning - this directly related to everything I was doing to teach from home when all were at distance, and when I continued after students returned to campus. It also involved my growth in Google Suites tools - slides, Google Classroom, Forms, etc.

2. My second PGE was related to the 2nd grade Gourd drum project I developed when the students couldn't do any singing at school.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

I am happy to share and support any teachers who may embark on their NBCT journey

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

Get full support during your National Board Certification for every aspect of the process, while deeply examining and reflecting on your own teaching strengthes and areas for future growth.

PD #231


 

ACDA NATIONAL VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

Posted on June 06, 2021 by Deborah Thomson

U.S. Music Teacher

Summary of workshop/​opportunity

ACDA annual event to meet and interact with colleagues, as well as get inspired by world-class performances. Professionals from all over the globe will participate to provide an atmosphere replete with diverse resources, concerts, and sessions to inspire and grow your career as a choral director.

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?1. That live performances of choirs wearing masks actually can be very successful.

2. The dedication of the directors and choir members to persevere in spite of COVID is very inspiring.

3. That the acoustics of a performing space is essential to consider for the quality of sound.

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

The phrase "vintage innovation" means leveraging retro tools and classic ideas blended with the use of modern tools and new ideas to create meaningful learning. This really resonated with me as I have seen so many instances in which teachers and schools adopt the latest technology and have students use it without a greater plan for how it serves their learning goals. Throughout this program, while we learned how to use technology, apps, websites, and digital tools to engage students, the focus was always on how the technology is useful because it is a tool to address a problem or need versus it being useful simply because students were learning how to use the technology. For example, learning the use the 3D printer is a useful skill because a student designs a face shield in wanting to be able to help the local hospital address their need for more protective gear. This course aligned well with my belief that all leaners need to know what they're learning and why and be engaged in learning opportunities that have multiple paths that are as different as their experiences and learning styles.

What is still circling around in my head?

I'd like to be able to spend time at the Krause Center for Innovation actually collaborating and using the materials and tools there in person to further develop my skills. The class ended up having to be virtual all three semesters due to Covid and I would like more time to apply the skills we learned that were demonstrated for us and discussed. I feel like this was a great opportunity for me to learn about the many different facets for design thinking and making using technology and now I'd like to be sure to utilize the introductory skills I learned and develop them further.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes


PD #230


 

UNIDIVERSITY MAKERSPACE COORDINATOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

Posted on May 10, 2021 by Fran Yang

Makery and Technology Integration Specialist

Triangle/Square/Circle

What are 3 things I took away/​learned?

1) Design thinking is a process that can be applied to all areas of learning and help the learner to develop vital skills for navigating an uncertain and constantly evolving future. Students enrich their ability to be divergent thinkers, ask questions, view things from multiple perspectives, be empathetic and seek the opinion of others, diversify their interests, experiment with new ideas and embrace mistakes and failure as a crucial part of learning and growing.

2) In our globalized world, students need to embrace the local and the diversity in their own community if we want them to value diversity and embrace human connection on a global scale. The empathy part of the design thinking process is an opportunity to provide students with an authentic audience and purpose as they look to assess and serve the community needs around them. Service learning blends well with the Makery and when students connect in meaningful ways to the local community, they improve their communication skills, build relationships, develop empathy and their ability to take feedback, they see content as relevant, become advocates, and can be empowered to change the world through authentic, meaningful projects at school.

3)PBL involves more voice and choice for the learners and less teacher talk and it focuses on structure and quality over quantity of instructional content. A subtle but impactful shift in engaging students in PBL is to think about a project as the learning mechanism that new content is taught through versus an end-product that demonstrates learning that has happened. The goal of integrating direct instruction in a way that feels authentic can be uncomfortable for teachers as it may require periods of students being confused and curious before they have clarity and understanding of new concepts. Meaningful learning is often messy and we have to allow that to happen and trust that it is part of the process. The idea of using "strategic confusion" as a specific strategy to engage students in impactful learning experiences was one takeaway. This includes presenting mysteries, allowing for mistakes, not shying away from confusing material, avoiding simplistic explanations (which often reinforce misconceptions), testing possible answers, identifying when you don't know something (as a lifelong learner) and encouraging dialogue.

What squared with my existing practice/​beliefs?

The phrase "vintage innovation" means leveraging retro tools and classic ideas blended with the use of modern tools and new ideas to create meaningful learning. This really resonated with me as I have seen so many instances in which teachers and schools adopt the latest technology and have students use it without a greater plan for how it serves their learning goals. Throughout this program, while we learned how to use technology, apps, websites, and digital tools to engage students, the focus was always on how the technology is useful because it is a tool to address a problem or need versus it being useful simply because students were learning how to use the technology. For example, learning the use the 3D printer is a useful skill because a student designs a face shield in wanting to be able to help the local hospital address their need for more protective gear. This course aligned well with my belief that all leaners need to know what they're learning and why and be engaged in learning opportunities that have multiple paths that are as different as their experiences and learning styles.

What is still circling around in my head?

I'd like to be able to spend time at the Krause Center for Innovation actually collaborating and using the materials and tools there in person to further develop my skills. The class ended up having to be virtual all three semesters due to Covid and I would like more time to apply the skills we learned that were demonstrated for us and discussed. I feel like this was a great opportunity for me to learn about the many different facets for design thinking and making using technology and now I'd like to be sure to utilize the introductory skills I learned and develop them further.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

Two of the books used for this coursework, LAUNCH: A Design Thinking Framework and Vintage

Innovation, were both excellent and applicable to engaging teaching strategies in any discipline.

Interested in collaborating or do you have questions aboutUnidiversity Makerspace Coordinator Certification Program?

Reach out to Fran directly to begin a conversation!

education!

PD #229

 

TEACHING THE MIDDLE GRADES DATA AND PROBABILITY STANDARDS THROUGH EXPLORATORY TASKS

Posted on April 05, 2021 by May Wong

6th - 8th Grade Math Teacher

Goals & Collaborations

What were your big takeaways from your workshop or project?

-Data science should play a larger part in middle and high school mathematics. Only 3% of 7th graders get to 12th grade calculus, yet 60% of adults say they use data in their daily lives. Data science plays a central role in the new math framework coming out later this year.

- Many resources were shared: New York Times' "What's going on in this graph?", Statista.com, Youcubed data course, and CODAP online graphing app - Rather than just calculate landmarks such as mean, median, mode, students should investigate the shape of data.

How does what you learned connect to your goals this year?

My ongoing goals are to try to connect lessons to the students' lives.

How might this opportunity lead to collaboration with other faculty?

Jess and I would like to use the Dear Data book project with our 6th graders. They will collect data (topic TBA but one that is relevant to their lives) for one week. Using visual cues such as color, shape, frequency, size, etc. they will represent their multivariate data.

Would you recommend this opportunity?

Yes

Optionally, offer a one sentence recommendation for the opportunity.

YouCubed is a great resource for math


Interested in collaborating or do you have questions about Teaching Middle Grads Data and Probability Standards Through Exploratory Task?

Reach out to May Wong directly to begin a conversation!

education!

PD# 228

 

ART OF FAIRY TALE ANALYSIS

Posted on March 03, 2021 by Cyndera Quackenbush

Director of Special Programs

Summary of workshop/opportunity

This Certificate Program in The Art of Fairy Tale Analysis invites students into the practice of reading the patterns and translating the archetypal meaning in the tales. This deeper understanding of Fairy Tales allows for a more meaningful choosing and sharing of classic tales to children of all ages.

Based on what I learned…

What are you going to START doing?

I am going to start looking more deeply at the messages that are conveyed in each of the tales I tell to students. Looking at world events and stage of development, what story is best for this day and time? How does the story impact the students?

What are you going to STOP doing?

I am going to stop telling any story I have not thought about and looked at more carefully from the angles mentioned above.

What are you going to CONTINUE doing?

I am going to continue telling stories! I will also continue telling old stories with a twist so that they can meet the minds and concerns for our students in today's world. I will also continue finding games that pair well with the stories for the students to embody each character and work out the contents of the story through play.

Would you recommend this workshop?
Yes.

Interested in collaborating or do you have questions about Art of Fairy Take Analysis?

Reach out to Cyndera directly to begin a conversation!

PD ID# 227

 

CPE WINTER INSTITUTE 2021

Posted on January 22, 2021by Cate Svendsen 

Associate Kindergarten Teacher

Summary of workshop/opportunity

This years workshop was centered around moving beyond the "either/or" binary thinking that exists in today's schools. Lead my Rosetta Lee, we discussed the conflicts inside the classrooms, and walked us through a powerful tool to guide our new way of thinking, moving away from binary conversations.

Based on what I learned…

What are you going to START doing?

I am going to start bringing this new way of thinking into the classroom and make sure that it becomes part of the lessons. As I create lessons, I want to think through how it is either promoting non binary thinking or just perpetuating the old conversations. I liked the tool we learned, breaking down each possible approach to a problem into four different segments and brainstorming the pros and cons to each.

What are you going to STOP doing?

I am going to stop bringing in binary thinking into the classroom, either consciously or subconsciously because that was the system I was brought up in and there are so many more conversations to be had that bring an infinite number of ways to think about a problem or approach a situation or a lesson.

What are you going to CONTINUE doing?

I want to continue my own personal education on the best way to lead a non binary way of teaching by attending more PD opportunities, doing my own reading and through having the difficult conversations.

Would you recommend this workshop?
Yes.

Interested in collaborating or do you have questions about CPE Winter Institute?

Reach out to Cate directly to begin a conversation!

PD ID# 226